Tag Archives: David Lee Roth

A Different Kind Of Truth

The test had arrived for Van Halen to commence on a path once again with David Lee Roth. Indeed, the band had for the most part, gotten their act together. Being a reunited front with the new line up of David Lee Roth, Eddie Van Halen, Alex Van Halen and Wolfgang Van Halen, Eddie’s son the band had to deliver a new record for the Van Halen fans.

The test came when the record was released in February 2012. However, although on paper the songs were old, leftover rewrites, the record itself is an enjoyable listen, although not exactly a perfect record itself.

Van Halen have got back to work with a renewed and fresh approach to their music.

Picture courtesy http://loudwire.com/van-halen-launch-2012-north-american-tour/

The record begins with the trashy and enjoyable, “Tattoo”. Although the song is enjoyable, it wears out after successive listens. Still, it is way better than anything on Van Halen III, pure proof of the band’s new and more focused direction.

The glorious “She’s The Woman” is a much better song. It starts off with a brilliant guitar part, leading into a loud and catchy tune, with an interesting solo in the midsection. Not bad overall.

The chugging “You and Your Blues” follows, indicating a different side to the band’s repertoire of music. Entertaining and very listenable.

For the new Van Halen record, Eddie Van Halen used the latest in EVH Wolfgang guitars, an EVH USA Wolfgang Stealth which sounds loud and powerful as it does here.

Picture courtesy http://www.evhgear.com/gear/guitars/wolfgang-usa/wolfgang-stealth-ebony-fingerboard-stealth-black-w-case/

The next song, “China Town” is rather awful. In a way it is sort of laughable, but sounds very ordinary indeed. For those who like skipping tracks, you may be best off doing so here.

“Blood and Fire” follows, which is another rather ordinary song with a forgettable chorus. Still it is miles better than anything that Van Halen have recorded since Balance.

The pseudo-thrash of “Bullethead” follows, rather strangely catchy. It is a loud, full on roar of a song. Good listening.

Eddie Van Halen himself is back on track and happier than ever to create new music.

Picture courtesy https://www.celebritydiagnosis.com/people_tag/eddie-van-halen/

“As Is” continues the rather nonsensical lyrics that seem to dominate this album. Indeed, some of the older Van Halen fans may be disappointed by this approach to lyric writing, yet is very musically viable indeed.

The rather boring and forgettable “Honeybabysweetiedoll” makes as much sense as it sounds by the song title, and the song itself. It seems as though Van Halen had put the worst tracks on the first half of this record…

It is fantastic to see Eddie’s son Wolfgang Van Halen part of the Van Halen crew, a remarkably musically talented young man.

Picture courtesy http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-wolfgang-van-halen-talks-bass-different-kind-truth-and-more

Next up, “The Trouble with Never” is a rather good and catchy piece which demonstrates how wonderful and well respected Eddie Van Halen should be considered and deserves every bit of respect for his great guitar skills on it. Not bad at all.

“Outta Space” is obviously a rework, but not a bad one at that. Deeming indeed that the earth is full, it continues the nonsensical slur of lyrics that predominates the album.

The “Ice Cream Man” of this record, “Stay Frosty” is an anti-religious and reveals that in life, one must Stay Frosty in terms of laidback attitude. Starting off acoustically, it becomes a loud and rocking song that is well served.

David Lee Roth and the three Van Halens have successfully buried the majority of issues between each other and work cohesively together as a unit with great success.

Picture courtesy http://www.vhnd.com/2012/02/16/van-halen-allowing-fans-to-shoot-photos-video-at-shows/

“Big River” follows, which is a good rework of one of the songs on the Van Halen Zero demo. With all these wonderful songs here, one must think that the wait for a new Van Halen record was sure worth it.

The last, loudest and heaviest, and most likely, the best song of the album “Beats Workin’” shows Eddie Van Halen at his best. Indeed, those many years of tone chasing per se have proved that EVH himself can create a monstrous and undeniably brilliant sound. Legendary.

As long as their efforts continue with this new approach, Van Halen will continue to survive well into the 21st century.

Picture courtesy https://wallpapersafari.com/free-van-halen-logo-wallpapers/

Overall, the critics all agreed that this was a good, though not great, effort from Van Halen. Indeed, it has been many years between the previous Van Halen III and the A Different Kind of Truth record. Despite all this, it is a solidly good record that shows the future direction of a reworked and re-energised band. Well done.

Cleaning Out The Closet – Van Halen Gets Their Problems Sorted

After the disastrous reunion tour of 2004, Van Halen again went into hiding. Nothing really seemed to change for the once mighty and cohesive group. There seemed to be such a long time where nothing but silence was observed from the group. Barely anything seemed to come out of this.

In 2006, some changes occurred, however. Firstly, Michael Anthony, long time bass player of Van Halen was dumped from the band in favour of Eddie Van Halen’s son Wolfgang. For many older fans in particular, this seemed a criminal move. Why on earth would Van Halen do such a thing?

The renewed Van Halen seemed to once again really understand why they were there for rock and roll in the first place.

Picture courtesy http://www.vhnd.com/2014/09/27/7-years-ago-van-halen-launches-first-tour-with-david-lee-roth-since-1984/

Turns out that from a logical marketing point, it was very clever. Although Wolfgang was only in his teen years at the time, he grew into the role very quickly. To this day, Wolfgang Van Halen has proven an excellent singer and bass player, and has ventured outside of Van Halen musically to do his own thing with other groups quite well. Although neither can be compared to one another, Wolfgang Van Halen perhaps seems more musically active than Michael Anthony ever really was in his own right in Van Halen.

Once this had occurred, the three Van Halens worked on the next idea: David Lee Roth coming back to Van Halen. The question was though, how would it be done?

Strategically driven, Wolfgang Van Halen gave a call to David Lee Roth in 2006 and asked if he would be interested in rejoining Van Halen. After consideration, David Lee Roth said yes and rejoined the group.

Although relations between David Lee Roth and the Van Halens are never perfect, the group of four are happier and more productive than ever.

Picture courtesy http://aarontallent.com/?p=4061

Also, Eddie Van Halen cleaned up his state of mind around this time. Inspired by his young son Wolfgang, he began a fight to overcome his addictions. Although taking one step back in 2007 by visiting a rehabilitation clinic for addiction to a substitute drug for alcohol, Eddie took two steps forward and is now alcohol free and much more focused. He also switched from smoking cigarettes to smoking an electronic cigarette in an effort to clean up.

Eventually by 2007 Van Halen were ready to tour again and did just that. The tour of that year was a critical and commercial success, and gave Eddie Van Halen the chance to test his new Fender prototype gear along the way. This happened with a lot of effort, patience and understanding from the Van Halen fans in particular. But now Van Halen were on a definite up, and never looking back.

Now that Van Halen were working properly once again, they fared very well with their contemporaries in music.

Picture courtesy http://aintitbalenews.com/node/2622/van-halen

 

References:

  1. Eddie Van Halen’s Struggle With Alcohol And Drugs: What’s The Root Cause? 2013. Clarity Way. https://www.clarityway.com/blog/van-halens-struggle/

The Best Of Both Worlds

After six years of no album releases by Van Halen, a rushed compilation was assembled with the intention of representing Sammy Hagar’s side of the Van Halen story more clearly.

The Best Of Both Worlds does accurately capture much of what made both eras of David Lee Roth and Sammy Hagar, particularly the latter, great. But it does it in a very schizophrenic way.

Instead of laying out the track list with one disc for either main lead singer, it puts the eras track by track. This does upset the flow of the album significantly, with there being no real progression. It just seems all over the place. The album does have great songs, but there is no structure to this compilation.

The marketing behind Van Halen around this time was very poor.

Picture courtesy http://www.reuters.com/article/us-vanhalen-idUSN0746408220070808

On a more interesting note, there were three new tracks with Sammy Hagar. The first, ‘It’s About Time’ was the best, but very ordinary regardless. The following track, ‘Up For Breakfast’ was humourous, yet a little weaker. And ‘Learning To See’ was horrible. Yet, despite the quality of these tracks musically, they finally show the full on roar of the Peavey Wolfgang, a truly underrated instrument and the great Peavey 5150 amps that Eddie used to create his sound.

So, a collector’s item? Only for those who had been hanging out to hear a bit more Van Halen. In short, rather unnecessary otherwise and a sign that Van Halen needed more time to get their act together before recording more new material. Still, worth buying if you really need all Van Halen in your collection.

At last, the Peavey Wolfgang was well represented on the three new songs with Sammy Hagar.

Picture courtesy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peavey_EVH_Wolfgang

Van Halen: Best Of Volume One

As previously discussed, the first Van Halen compilation came along with the rotation of singers. Yet, despite this, how does it sound?

It was a shame that for this particular compilation only one disc was released. Van Halen had more than enough material to fill up two discs of songs, but regrettably only chose one instead. There are many tracks that could have made it onto another disc which would have been amazing.

The two new songs with David Lee Roth were amazing.

Picture courtesy http://www.vhnd.com/2014/09/04/van-halens-original-lineup-presents-mtv-award/

Still, there is a fairly good selection here of music by Van Halen. It begins with ‘Eruption’, leading all the way to ‘Panama’ (or ‘Hot For Teacher’ if you had the Japanese copy of this album) for the first David Lee Roth era. Once that is over, very much the hit singles from the Sammy Hagar era are here. And yes, many fans were aware of these songs yet for a one disc compilation it strikingly sounds well chosen.

Then we have the new tracks. ‘Humans Being’ is very much of one the worst “Van Hagar” tracks you will hear. It is a dirge like song, only redeemed by the loud, prolonged scream at the end of the song. A poor effort indeed.

It is really hard to know what Van Halen and Eddie Van Halen himself were really thinking around this time.

Picture courtesy http://www.guitarplayer.com/news/1024/eddie-van-halen-performs-jimi-hendrixs-fire-and-little-wing–video/52965

Then we get two brand new David Lee Roth songs, ‘Can’t Get This Stuff No More’ is very cool indeed. “Got a date with a supermodel, I know I can make it…” begins Dave on the first new song. It sounds wonderful and fresh, something that Balance seems to lack. Not bad.

More catchy though is ‘Me Wise Magic’. A full on, rhythmic tune with style, it is an underrated gem out of the Van Halen cannon. Eddie Van Halen uses some cool licks on his new Peavey Wolfgang here, and it does justice indeed.

Eddie Van Halen really does show his Brown Sound progression on this particular album.

Picture courtesy http://atlasicons.photoshelter.com/gallery/EDDIE-VAN-HALEN-1996/G0000wb.BUOeMwgk/C0000YdNgrVtpTBs

The good thing about this compilation, regardless of it needing to be more inclusive, is that we can clearly hear for the first time Eddie Van Halen’s Brown Sound transition throughout the years. From the first Frankenstrat on ‘Eruption’ to his Peavey gear on ‘Me Wise Magic’, somehow upon listening one gets the feeling that this is exactly what Eddie desired to show listeners. He seemed very content with showing the difference in sound and tone over the years.

The bad thing about this compilation though is that it does fall short of a truly amazing listen by being too selective of some songs and also needs more of them. After the fade out of the last track, you may sit there and feel left out of what could have been much more.

There could have and should have been another disc of Van Halen material. Yet, despite this, this album is absolutely essential to understanding the Brown Sound progression over the years.

Picture courtesy http://www.covershut.com/cover-tags/Van-Halen-Best-Of-Volume-1-1996.html

It is the better of the two compilations though, and is a must for those who wish to understand the Brown Sound in a logical progression. A photo of Eddie’s Peavey Wolfgang is in the booklet. Unfortunately, nobody saw the future at the time, which is exactly what this compilation was for.

Chaos in Van Halen – The Beginning of the Singer Revolving Door

It was not a good or easy time for Van Halen in 1996. The pressure within was definitely consuming the once powerful and cohesive group. Although Eddie himself was busy promoting his brand new line up of Peavey Wolfgang guitars to show that he still had the genius and ability to craft wonderful instruments, the truth was that Eddie Van Halen was in an alcohol (and some say drug) induced decline.

All parties involved with Van Halen were running to the media to explain the problems within Van Halen. Unfortunately, Eddie Van Halen was no exception to this.

Picture courtesy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqUJ9Vdjs88

The fact was that Ed and Sammy Hagar did not see eye-to-eye on what Van Halen represented. Different stories have emerged from both parties on what really happened around this time, yet one thing that was certain was that in 1996 Sammy Hagar and Eddie Van Halen had a large fallout after Van Halen indicated that they were seeking to get David Lee Roth back into Van Halen to record some new songs for their first greatest hits album Van Halen: The Best of Volume One. Although this website is about Eddie Van Halen, it is important to cover these issues as well.

Once Sammy Hagar was no longer a part of Van Halen, in an odd stroke of fate, Eddie Van Halen attempted to recruit Mitch Malloy into the band. This was kept top secret at the time and no real leak of what happened did not occur until many years later when Mitch Malloy confirmed that until the MTV Music Awards in that year happened, he was given the green light to be their third singer. He revoked the offer after seeing David Lee Roth with Van Halen on that night.

Mitch Malloy was keen on joining Van Halen around this time until bad things got their way.

Picture courtesy http://wileykoepp.com/2013/12/mitch-malloy-van-halen-replacement-for-sammy-hagar-almost/

Perhaps Eddie Van Halen himself was foreseeing a return to David Lee Roth era Van Halen? Who knows, but what was clear is that they did indeed record two songs for their first compilation with David Lee Roth, ‘Can’t Get This Stuff No More’ and ‘Me Wise Magic’, and both are the most underrated Van Halen songs you will listen to. Still, it was not enough to keep the band going together after the infamous MTV Music Award 1996 Ceremony.

Although stories do differ, what is clear is that David Lee Roth and Eddie Van Halen did not see eye-to-eye on the fact that Roth wished to be returned as lead singer of Van Halen, but Eddie wanted a more methodical approach. Of course, regardless of any bad blood on either side, the pair fell out and prompted a rethink of a new singer for Van Halen. After the MTV Music Award night, Van Halen were never the same again.

The fact that the entire band were now relying upon the media to express their disgust at what had happened with Van Halen revealed a lack of confidence in any musical project whatsoever involved with them.

Picture courtesy http://www.vhnd.com/2014/09/04/van-halens-original-lineup-presents-mtv-award/

The band eventually returned to their rehearsals for a new singer. They selected Extreme frontman Gary Cherone, who had not really worked along with Van Halen before and was a new addition to the Van Halen group. By all accounts, Gary was very easy going with the group and although the following record proved he may not have been David Lee Roth or Sammy Hagar, he did fit the bill at the time indeed.

Gary Cherone only lasted in Van Halen for three years and sung on the disastrous Van Halen III album, but he seems much more respectful towards Van Halen and what they represent than what Sammy Hagar shows nowadays, strangely. Although he is not suited to Van Halen’s style of music per se, it was what the band needed at the time.

Gary Cherone really did do his best to hold things together in Van Halen.

Picture courtesy http://www.vhnd.com/2015/06/09/gary-cherone-van-halens-tokyo-dome-live-concert/

 

References:

 

  1. Greene, Andy. 2013. Flashback: Van Halen tours with former Extreme singer Gary Cherone. http://www.rollingstone.com/music/videos/flashback-van-halen-tours-with-former-extreme-singer-gary-cherone-20130115
  2. Van Halen News Desk. 2013. How Mitch Malloy Almost Became Van Halen’s Third Singer (Video). http://www.vhnd.com/2013/11/06/how-mitch-malloy-almost-became-van-halens-third-singer-video/
  3. 2013. Van Halen News Story on The David Lee Roth & Sammy Hagar Break-ups – 1998. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etsan65vOqc
  4. Van Halen News Desk. 2013. Gary Cherone Reflects on his Three-Year Stint in Van Halen. http://www.vhnd.com/2013/01/17/gary-cherone-reflects/

5150

“Hello baby!” is where the 5150 album begins, introducing the Sammy Hagar era Van Halen. This album is important in the Van Halen back catalogue, as it changed Van Halen, their sound and their overall perspective of the music for many years to come. It was also their first #1 album in the U.S. prompting a huge amount of interest in the band from this point onwards.

Van Halen seemed refreshed and ahead of the competition early on with Sammy Hagar.

Picture courtesy http://1979rock.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/1986-vanhagar-5150.html

In retrospect, this album is not dissimilar from its previous counterpart 1984, which sounds almost musically similar. It was the effort of pure luck for Van Halen. Without the contribution of Sammy Hagar and the new producers (Mick Jones, Donn Landee), this album would have been nothing.

“Good Enough” kicks off the album, a catchy, humourous tale of food and sex. The sound here is not as good as the sound on previous albums, as the group had lost Ted Templeman as overall producer. However, Eddie’s playing is fantastic here, sounding like he really loves shredding away on his Kramer 5150.

Eddie reached his peak of excellence in terms of his guitar playing on the 1984 and 5150 albums, and was much more confident with his skills as a result.

Picture courtesy https://www.pinterest.com/norseman72/worlds-best-guitarists/

Following up is the hit single, “Why Can’t This Be Love?” This song is synth heavy, with the guitars taking a back step to the electronic sounds. In retrospect, this song sounds very dated. But at the time, it was killer. It is still catchy enough and listenable regardless.

The next song, “Get Up” is one of the worst Sammy Hagar era Van Halen songs recorded. Strangely enough, the boys decided to place this onto the album anyway and even play it live. It is the first of two songs where Eddie used the Steinberger 5150 on it. But apart from some pacing drum work by Alex Van Halen, it falls short.

Following up is “Dreams”, which is a lot better. This sort of song created a lot of criticism from older David Lee Roth era Van Halen fans who disliked it intensely. Indeed, this song could never have been done with him. Sammy Hagar really hits the higher notes here, and the guitar solo is unusual and interesting, pointing to the fact that Eddie Van Halen wanted to branch out further with the sound of Van Halen at this time.

Sammy Hagar is still a great singer, and his role as the second lead singer for Van Halen boosted his career to new heights.

Picture courtesy http://www.rollingstone.com/music/pictures/sammy-hagar-a-history-in-photos-20110301/1986-0094850

A singalong number, “Summer Nights” follows using with Ed using the Steinberger 5150. It is very catchy and comes as a feel good song. There is some understated playing by Eddie Van Halen on this number, and still sounds fresh today.

“Best of Both Worlds” follows and sounds wonderfully awesome. Using the Kramer 5150, Eddie changes his playing subtly. Gone are the loud hard rock solos of old, instead a more thought out, methodical approach to his playing is here. A wonderful number indeed.

There was something miraculous of being able to change lead singer in a great rock and roll band, and still put out great music as well.

Picture courtesy http://www.vhnd.com/2013/03/27/27-years-ago-today-van-halens-first-concert-with-sammy-hagar-as-frontman/

Sounding somewhat different, “Love Walks In” is a spacey, keyboard driven song about aliens in love. Although seemingly strange nowadays, it was keeping with the fashion of the time of science fiction. With catchy melodies and an uplifting solo by Eddie Van Halen, it is essential for “Van Hagar” fans. A must.

“5150” is the next song, a more stripped down rock/pop song about the compromise of love. It really is a touching sort of song. You can imagine David Lee Roth sniggering and rolling his eyes to this piece. But that is not the point. It is emotional and uplifting, in a way that David Lee Roth era Van Halen never could be…

Eddie Van Halen was evolving musically, and the 5150 album sounds very different to anything David Lee Roth era Van Halen ever offered.

Picture courtesy https://www.pinterest.com/pin/356558495469932752/

And speaking of David Lee Roth, the throwaway “Inside” is a direct dig by the band about their former singer. Although perhaps unnecessary, it has some interesting lyrics and samples of chatter (including somebody shouting not-so-discreetly “Alimony!”) which proves that the band were not going to water down any attacks towards David Lee Roth. How quickly things can change…

The reason why this album was so successful was the fact that during the Sammy Hagar era, Van Halen were now mainstream. The sounds (screaming vocals, shredding guitars, thumping basslines, electronic drums and keyboards) plus the fact that everybody knew them for the single “Jump” put Van Halen in the spotlight. Musically, the album seems a little weaker than otherwise hoped for. Still, Van Halen were happy to create music in a newer style and were not looking back.

The era commonly dubbed “Van Hagar”, although different from the David Lee Roth era Van Halen, was very successful, and proof that change is sometimes not a bad thing.

Picture courtesy http://pennycan.createaforum.com/music/van-halen-discography-(the-sammy-hagar-years)/

Changing line-up and changing sound – From David Lee Roth to Sammy Hagar

Understandably, prior to this entry this website has not covered the Sammy Hagar era Van Halen. The author has left out his name on certain issues as to keep the two singers’ music and representation separate.

To begin with, there were always issues in Van Halen from the start between the main members of the band. The original line-up with bassist Mike Stone did not work as he was not seen as talented as Michael Anthony. The band opted David Lee Roth to join Van Halen as their lead singer, as Eddie Van Halen was not comfortable with it at the time.

Although DLR and EVH get along much better these days, relations are still not the best between the two. However, this is not always a problem for a band still recording and touring to this day.

Picture courtesy http://magazine.dv247.com/2011/07/05/tone-clinic-part-17-edward-van-halen/

This line-up persisted for just over a decade. There has been much publicized banter on the internet, music magazines and other places about the change of singer from David Lee Roth to Sammy Hagar.

So, why Sammy Hagar? Well for a start, the first main line-up of the band did not get along very well from the release of the 1984 album onwards. Various private meetings were held to try and hold Van Halen together after the release of that particular album. It soon became clear that David Lee Roth did not like the sound and direction of Van Halen’s music around this time. Eddie wanted to branch out more, whilst David Lee Roth thought it would be ridiculous for a rock band to even consider placing synthesisers or other production techniques into their music. This, by far, was the biggest reason for the initial split. Ed even considered leaving Van Halen at one point around 1983. Stylistically, the band wanted more, and David Lee Roth wanted a more back-to-basics approach.

Sammy Hagar’s entry into Van Halen in 1985 represented a more melodic and poppy approach. Sales of their albums were strong throughout this time.

Picture courtesy http://www.vulture.com/2011/03/the_nine_saddest_eddie_van_hal.html

The second reason was the idea that David Lee Roth could not and should not be allowed to create his own music. Indeed, David Lee Roth suggested in an early 1985 interview that he was sick of being tied to the Van Halen project and just wanted to get on with it instead. Comments like these did not go down well in the Van Halen camp.

On April 1, 1985, Roth mentioned in a statement that he had left Van Halen. This was initially met with some scepticism, as it was on April fool’s Day. However, later that year in the mid-August issue of Rolling Stone, Eddie Van Halen told the world that the first lineup of Van Halen were over, and that the band were seeking a replacement singer. It looked like Van Halen were over for good this time.

Eddie did his best to hold things together, and managed to do so. Auditions for singers were begun, and after some time, a decent singer, yet very different to what David Lee Roth had to offer stylistically was presented to Eddie by his car mechanic: Sammy Hagar.

This cover of a late 1985 Rolling Stone Magazine suggests than the then new lineup of Van Halen was quite happy to make music without David Lee Roth.

Picture courtesy https://franny032.wordpress.com/tag/eddie-van-halen/

Sammy Hagar was not unfamiliar with Van Halen. In fact, they had toured together (although neither met each other personally until 1985) in the late 1970s. Sammy Hagar was originally famous for having a stellar solo career after inspiring, yes, Van Halen to follow a similar sound to what he was pursuing at the time. Sammy Hagar was lead singer in the group Montrose and released a string of successful solo albums prior to entering Van Halen. So, it seemed like an ideal fit for the band after years of David Lee Roth’s excessive macho behaviour…or so the band thought.

Montrose is a killer album that introduced Sammy Hagar into the world of music.

Picture courtesy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montrose_(album)

Regardless of what the band now thinks of this change, fans were rewarded with a newer, more poppy style of Van Halen. Some older fans do prefer Sammy Hagar over David Lee Roth. Indeed, listening back to the Sammy Hagar era Van Halen: 5150; OU812; For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge and Balance (along with the live albums recorded as well), one is reminded that this self-conscious change refocused the band’s music in a somewhat different direction. Some DLR fans were not impressed with this new music, naming it “screechy”. But the point was, it was not simply a change of singer, but also a change in style.

What about David Lee Roth? Well he embarked on a moderately successful career beginning with the 1985 EP Crazy From The Heat until he properly rejoined Van Halen in 2007. But on David Lee Roth’s second long term stay, the band were very different in terms of maturity and musical direction that they wished to experience. But “Diamond Dave” in 1985 had enough, and left Van Halen and did not re-join until 1996. But still when it comes to music, although personnel can change, the music can still be wonderful and uplifting to the listener, no matter who is the lead singer.

David Lee Roth’s solo career did not reach the heights of Van Halen, but was successful nonetheless.

Picture courtesy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crazy_from_the_Heat

References:

  1. Renoff, Greg. How David Lee Roth really left Van Halen. http://ultimateclassicrock.com/david-lee-roth-left-van-halen/